Blog

By Tony Diciacce 25 Sep, 2017

Safety First 

Most people don’t consider this when deciding on a new heating system, but you could be at risk for carbon monoxide poisoning from an old furnace with a cracked heat exchanger. Another safety aspect is whether you run the risk of having a boiler break down during the coldest time of the season (which is when it tends to happen). It’s more than just comfort. Exposure to low temperatures for too long has health impacts, especially for the elderly and young babies.

Why Repair? 
When things are tight and you’re trying to save cash, sometimes a simple repair may be more than sufficient, depending on the age of the boiler or furnace. Just remember to consider labor costs, as well as the cost of parts. The first thing to make a note of is the age of the equipment compared to its life expectancy. Furnaces typically last in the 15-20 year range while boilers can go for 20-30 years. Some boilers even last up to 40 or 50 years!

When to Replace
There are times when repairing your old furnace or boiler just won’t work. If you have to wait several weeks to get parts because your heating equipment is obsolete, it’s definitely time to consider replacement. Even if you can still get parts, you have to face the reduction in efficiency as your equipment ages. This translates into more of your money in the utility’s pocket. As long as you can afford it, there are some real benefits of replacing your system:


You have the opportunity to upgrade to a more efficient system. It’s more than just getting the 80% efficiency a new furnace would give. Nowadays, condensing type equipment can give upwards of 95% efficiency.

Even if you stick with the standard efficiency heater, your bills will come down simply because you regain your initial efficiency.

Once you have that new furnace or boiler, it is smooth sailing for the first five years. Not only is the heater new, but it will have warranty coverage for anything that does go wrong in that time.

The Right Support
Regardless of what you decide, you need the right technical support.  Call 585-500- HELP and Taylor Heating & Plumbing will make sure your home stays warm for the winter!

#call500help #needhelp #furnacerepair #newfurnace

o
By Tony Diciacce 18 Sep, 2017

P-trap problems
The p-trap is the curved pipe directly under your sink drain. Its job is to create a barrier between the opening of the drain and the rest of the sanitary system. The p-trap does this by trapping water to create that barrier.

For sinks you seldom use, or haven't used in a long time, the p-trap might be dry. This allows smells from the sanitary system to waft into your home through the drain. Turn on the faucet to replenish the barrier or pour a cup of water down the drain. Even though p-traps are now standard, it might be missing from under your sink. Check to make sure you have a p-trap and it's properly installed.

Build-up of gunk  
I'm not talking about the surface of your sink here. You've probably scrubbed that raw by now. The place where smelly gunk builds up that we can't see is in the drain itself.

Pour drain cleaner or bleach down the sink. But never use multiple cleaners at the same time. Bleach and ammonia, for instance, react to form chloramine vapour, which is highly toxic.

Poor venting
 
Sanitary piping must be vented to allow free flow. If a vent is poorly installed or blocked, the air between the p-trap and the rest of the sewer pipework has nowhere to go. The water flowing down the drain pushes against this air, which bubbles past it, bringing all the foul gases right into your home.

Each fixture must be vented with a vent pipe connection close to the trap. If it’s too far, the slope of the drain will prevent the water from draining properly, letting stinky air bubble into your house.

Supply troubles  
If you get that smell when water is running, then it’s likely the municipal or well supply. You may have to call the city or a professional (in the case of a well) to test your water. Alternatively, your faucet might be causing the smell from gunk build-up. You might be able to clean it depending on the type of faucet. Otherwise you'll have to get a new one installed.

Getting the right   help  
For some of these problems, you can fix it yourself. For others, you need the right professional. If you need help getting your bathroom or kitchen smelling fresh again, give us a call today 585-500-HELP.

By Tony Diciacce 12 Sep, 2017

Fall is the perfect time to get your home ready for winter. Your highest priority for this season is heating and that’s where your furnace comes in. Take care of it now so you’ll be spared the freezing consequences later.

1.  Replace filters  you probably spend most of your time indoors during the cold months. Dirty filters will contaminate the air you breathe, decrease the efficiency of your furnace and overwork your blower. Regular replacement will prevent this problem, and keep your winter breathing clearer.

2. Clear your mechanical room of debris  remove unrelated items from the room, particularly flammable items. Make sure to leave the areas around your unit clear for servicing or repair. Concentrate on the area around the duct opening from outside. This outdoor air is critical for your furnace to burn gas completely so you don’t get carbon monoxide in your home when it’s all fired up in winter.

3. Do visual checks on internal parts like the blower and burners  Open your furnace and take a look at the blower belt and motor. Make sure the belt is tight and clean any dust from the motor and blower. This ensures your furnace’s efficiency is maximized and reduces the likelihood of failure when the fan is running at top speed during winter. Inspect your burner and gas connection for signs of corrosion, dirt or loose connections. This is critical for safety of you and your family.

4. Clean ductwork and check for leaks  have a professional clean your ductwork before the season starts to keep the air in your home safe and breathable this winter. Turn on your furnace (you can use the fan-only setting on your thermostat) and listen closely for air escaping from ductwork. Note whether there are grilles with not enough air coming through as this can indicate a leak in that branch of your duct system.

5. Clean the area around your flue exhaust  as with the combustion air intake, make sure the area around the flue exhaust is clear of debris to keep your furnace working safely and to reduce the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. Remove branches and other debris from the flue outlet and when the snow comes, make sure it’s not piled around your flue vent. If the vent is on the roof, make sure there are no birds’ nests blocking the air from your furnace exhaust.

Have a professional inspect your furnace. Give us a call to do a full inspection and tune up so your furnace is completely ready for the coming winter.

By Tony Diciacce 25 Sep, 2017

Safety First 

Most people don’t consider this when deciding on a new heating system, but you could be at risk for carbon monoxide poisoning from an old furnace with a cracked heat exchanger. Another safety aspect is whether you run the risk of having a boiler break down during the coldest time of the season (which is when it tends to happen). It’s more than just comfort. Exposure to low temperatures for too long has health impacts, especially for the elderly and young babies.

Why Repair? 
When things are tight and you’re trying to save cash, sometimes a simple repair may be more than sufficient, depending on the age of the boiler or furnace. Just remember to consider labor costs, as well as the cost of parts. The first thing to make a note of is the age of the equipment compared to its life expectancy. Furnaces typically last in the 15-20 year range while boilers can go for 20-30 years. Some boilers even last up to 40 or 50 years!

When to Replace
There are times when repairing your old furnace or boiler just won’t work. If you have to wait several weeks to get parts because your heating equipment is obsolete, it’s definitely time to consider replacement. Even if you can still get parts, you have to face the reduction in efficiency as your equipment ages. This translates into more of your money in the utility’s pocket. As long as you can afford it, there are some real benefits of replacing your system:


You have the opportunity to upgrade to a more efficient system. It’s more than just getting the 80% efficiency a new furnace would give. Nowadays, condensing type equipment can give upwards of 95% efficiency.

Even if you stick with the standard efficiency heater, your bills will come down simply because you regain your initial efficiency.

Once you have that new furnace or boiler, it is smooth sailing for the first five years. Not only is the heater new, but it will have warranty coverage for anything that does go wrong in that time.

The Right Support
Regardless of what you decide, you need the right technical support.  Call 585-500- HELP and Taylor Heating & Plumbing will make sure your home stays warm for the winter!

#call500help #needhelp #furnacerepair #newfurnace

o
By Tony Diciacce 18 Sep, 2017

P-trap problems
The p-trap is the curved pipe directly under your sink drain. Its job is to create a barrier between the opening of the drain and the rest of the sanitary system. The p-trap does this by trapping water to create that barrier.

For sinks you seldom use, or haven't used in a long time, the p-trap might be dry. This allows smells from the sanitary system to waft into your home through the drain. Turn on the faucet to replenish the barrier or pour a cup of water down the drain. Even though p-traps are now standard, it might be missing from under your sink. Check to make sure you have a p-trap and it's properly installed.

Build-up of gunk  
I'm not talking about the surface of your sink here. You've probably scrubbed that raw by now. The place where smelly gunk builds up that we can't see is in the drain itself.

Pour drain cleaner or bleach down the sink. But never use multiple cleaners at the same time. Bleach and ammonia, for instance, react to form chloramine vapour, which is highly toxic.

Poor venting
 
Sanitary piping must be vented to allow free flow. If a vent is poorly installed or blocked, the air between the p-trap and the rest of the sewer pipework has nowhere to go. The water flowing down the drain pushes against this air, which bubbles past it, bringing all the foul gases right into your home.

Each fixture must be vented with a vent pipe connection close to the trap. If it’s too far, the slope of the drain will prevent the water from draining properly, letting stinky air bubble into your house.

Supply troubles  
If you get that smell when water is running, then it’s likely the municipal or well supply. You may have to call the city or a professional (in the case of a well) to test your water. Alternatively, your faucet might be causing the smell from gunk build-up. You might be able to clean it depending on the type of faucet. Otherwise you'll have to get a new one installed.

Getting the right   help  
For some of these problems, you can fix it yourself. For others, you need the right professional. If you need help getting your bathroom or kitchen smelling fresh again, give us a call today 585-500-HELP.

By Tony Diciacce 12 Sep, 2017

Fall is the perfect time to get your home ready for winter. Your highest priority for this season is heating and that’s where your furnace comes in. Take care of it now so you’ll be spared the freezing consequences later.

1.  Replace filters  you probably spend most of your time indoors during the cold months. Dirty filters will contaminate the air you breathe, decrease the efficiency of your furnace and overwork your blower. Regular replacement will prevent this problem, and keep your winter breathing clearer.

2. Clear your mechanical room of debris  remove unrelated items from the room, particularly flammable items. Make sure to leave the areas around your unit clear for servicing or repair. Concentrate on the area around the duct opening from outside. This outdoor air is critical for your furnace to burn gas completely so you don’t get carbon monoxide in your home when it’s all fired up in winter.

3. Do visual checks on internal parts like the blower and burners  Open your furnace and take a look at the blower belt and motor. Make sure the belt is tight and clean any dust from the motor and blower. This ensures your furnace’s efficiency is maximized and reduces the likelihood of failure when the fan is running at top speed during winter. Inspect your burner and gas connection for signs of corrosion, dirt or loose connections. This is critical for safety of you and your family.

4. Clean ductwork and check for leaks  have a professional clean your ductwork before the season starts to keep the air in your home safe and breathable this winter. Turn on your furnace (you can use the fan-only setting on your thermostat) and listen closely for air escaping from ductwork. Note whether there are grilles with not enough air coming through as this can indicate a leak in that branch of your duct system.

5. Clean the area around your flue exhaust  as with the combustion air intake, make sure the area around the flue exhaust is clear of debris to keep your furnace working safely and to reduce the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. Remove branches and other debris from the flue outlet and when the snow comes, make sure it’s not piled around your flue vent. If the vent is on the roof, make sure there are no birds’ nests blocking the air from your furnace exhaust.

Have a professional inspect your furnace. Give us a call to do a full inspection and tune up so your furnace is completely ready for the coming winter.

Share by: